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Former KCK cop accused of framing Black man for murder indicted in sex assault cases

By: - September 15, 2022 3:39 pm
The U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday a former police detective in Kansas City, Kansas, was indicted on six counts related to sexual assault of two women about 20 years ago. Roger Golubski, 69, was accused of federal civil rights crimes for assaulting victims while under "color of law." (Getty Images)

The U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday a former police detective in Kansas City, Kansas, was indicted on six counts related to sexual assault of two women about 20 years ago. Roger Golubski, 69, was accused of federal civil rights crimes for assaulting victims while under “color of law.” (Getty Images)

TOPEKA — A former Kansas City, Kansas, police detective was arrested Thursday by federal agents on a six-count indictment alleging repeated sexual assault of two women while leveraging his position as a law enforcement officer to perpetrate the crimes.

A federal grand jury in Topeka returned the indictment that was relied upon by the FBI to arrest Roger Golubski in Edwardsville, where he worked as a police officer for six years after retiring in 2010 from the KCK police department at the rank of captain.

Golubski, 69, also had been accused of framing a Black teenager in the mid-1990s in a murder case that led to 23 years of incarceration prior to the inmate’s exoneration.

Federal prosecutors said Golubski could be sentenced to a maximum of life in prison if convicted in U.S. District Court of crimes perpetrated against two women listed in court documents as O.W. and S.K. On Thursday, Golubski pleaded not guilty to the six charges.

Three counts related to multiple sexual assaults of a woman between 1998 and 2001 while on duty. The allegations included rape of her in and next to Golubski’s vehicle. He also was accused of abusing her through digital penetration and of forcing her to engage in oral sex on him.

The three counts in the indictment related to the second woman involved sexual assaults between 1999 and 2002, including an allegation Golubski raped her in her home and forced her to perform oral sex on him in his vehicle.

The U.S. Department of Justice said in a statement Golubski’s alleged misconduct included aggravated sexual abuse and kidnapping. He had been accused of assaulting Black women in Wyandotte County for years and of exchanging narcotics for information in criminal cases.

The FBI field office in Kansas City investigated the case in conjunction with the Kansas Bureau of Investigation.

Wyandotte County District Attorney Mark Dupree said he worked since 2017 to “bring about justice in this matter” and the indictment of Golubski showed “no one is above the law.”

The Metro Organization for Racial and Economic Equity, a faith-based group that called for a federal investigation of the KCK police department, said the indictment affirmed the need for “systematic accountability and reckoning” of a system that enabled Golubski to operate with impunity.

Golubski was named in the lawsuit filed by Lamonte McIntyre, who was wrongfully convicted in a double-homicide and imprisoned for nearly a quarter century. McIntyre alleged he was framed by Golubski in 1994.

In a deposition, Golubski invoked his constitutional right to avoid self-incrimination more than 500 times.

The Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, agreed to settle McIntyre’s civil rights case in June by paying him $12.5 million.

Federal prosecutors said the investigation of Golubski was ongoing and urged people with information about the former detective to contact the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI.

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Tim Carpenter
Tim Carpenter

Tim Carpenter has reported on Kansas for 35 years. He covered the Capitol for 16 years at the Topeka Capital-Journal and previously worked for the Lawrence Journal-World and United Press International. He has been recognized for investigative reporting on Kansas government and politics. He won the Kansas Press Association's Victor Murdock Award six times. The William Allen White Foundation honored him four times with its Burton Marvin News Enterprise Award. The Kansas City Press Club twice presented him its Journalist of the Year Award and more recently its Lifetime Achievement Award. He earned an agriculture degree at Kansas State University and grew up on a small dairy and beef cattle farm in Missouri. He is an amateur woodworker and drives Studebaker cars.

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