News Briefs

Lawrence attorney nominated for vacancy on Court of Appeals

By: - February 12, 2021 9:24 am
The Kansas Supreme Court issued an opinion Friday overturning a Kansas Court of Appeals decision in businessman Gene Bicknell's legendary tax case. The Supreme Court said Bicknell was a resident of Florida, which has no state income tax, during the period in which Kansas officials claimed he owned millions of dollars in state income taxes on sale of a company comprised of Pizza Hut franchises. (Tim Carpenter/Kansas Reflector)

The Kansas Supreme Court issued an opinion Friday overturning a Kansas Court of Appeals decision in businessman Gene Bicknell’s legendary tax case. The Supreme Court said Bicknell was a resident of Florida, which has no state income tax, during the period in which Kansas officials claimed he owned millions of dollars in state income taxes on sale of a company comprised of Pizza Hut franchises. (Tim Carpenter/Kansas Reflector)

TOPEKA — A Lawrence attorney with expertise in health care and employment law is Gov. Laura Kelly’s nominee to a vacancy on the Kansas Court of Appeals.

Jacy Hurst, a partner in Kutak Rock of Kansas City, Missouri, was the governor’s choice Thursday to replace Melissa Standridge, who was elevated from the Court of Appeals to the Kansas Supreme Court.

If confirmed by the Kansas Senate, Hurst would be the first woman of color on the state Court of Appeals.

“Jacy will be a great  asset and hardworking judge on the Court of Appeals,” Kelly said. “She is a lifelong Kansan who has not only excelled performing high-level work at some of Kansas City’s most competitive law firms, she also has the heart of a public servant.”

Her law practice at Kutak Rock involved employment litigation and health care transactions. Previously, she was general chounsel and chief compliance officer at Swope Health Services, which has 500 employees and serves 40,000 patients in the Kansas City area. She also had worked as a commercial litigator in product liability, insurance coverage, and employment discrimination cases. Hurst graduated from the University of Kansas’s law school in 2002.

Hurst serves as chair of the board of directors for Douglas County United Way, on the parent-teacher organization of her kids’ elementary school and on the Kansas Board of Law Examiners.

“I have spent my career helping large and small businesses and individuals resolve complex legal issues, and have seen the impact the law can have on people’s lives and businesses,” Hurst said. “As a Court of Appeals judge, my highest duty will be to hear each case and apply the law, as written, fairly and uniformly.”

Other nominees for the Court of Appeals included Fairway attorney Russell Keller of Fairway and Salina federal judicial clerk Angela Coble, the governor’s office said.

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Tim Carpenter
Tim Carpenter

Tim Carpenter has reported on Kansas for 35 years. He covered the Capitol for 16 years at the Topeka Capital-Journal and previously worked for the Lawrence Journal-World and United Press International. He has been recognized for investigative reporting on Kansas government and politics. He won the Kansas Press Association's Victor Murdock Award six times. The William Allen White Foundation honored him four times with its Burton Marvin News Enterprise Award. The Kansas City Press Club twice presented him its Journalist of the Year Award and more recently its Lifetime Achievement Award. He earned an agriculture degree at Kansas State University and grew up on a small dairy and beef cattle farm in Missouri. He is an amateur woodworker and drives Studebaker cars.

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