Agriculture

Rep. Troy Waymaster, left, and Sen. Carolyn McGinn, who chair the House and Senate budget committees, will await revision of state tax revenue estimates in November to assess whether cuts to the State Water Plan can be restored. (Tim Carpenter/Kansas Reflector)

Restoring full $8 million for Kansas water programs harder than turning a faucet

BY: - October 6, 2020

Revision of Kansas tax revenue estimates in November will offer clue as to whether State Water Plan budget cut can be reversed by Legislature, governor.

KU, Haskell and K-State to collaborate on $6 million intermittent stream research project

BY: - September 30, 2020

KSU, Haskell and KU in Kansas will collaborate on $6 million, four-year NSF research project on water-quality issues of intermittent streams.

Deal strikes balance between Quivira Wildlife Refuge, agriculture producers

BY: - September 29, 2020

Officials say a new agreement benefits both a national wildlife refuge and local agriculture producers in central Kansas, and it involves the extraction of several invasive plant species in the area along with water augmentation for a local creek. Water usage at the 22,135-acre Quivira National Wildlife Refuge in Stafford, Rice and Reno counties has […]

U.S. Rep. Roger Marshall, a Republican from Great Bend, will debate Democratic Party nominee Barbara Bollier, of Johnson County, on Saturday on WIBW at the first U.S. Senate debate of the general election campaign. (Tim Carpenter/Kansas Reflector)

U.S. Senate candidates Marshall, Bollier to debate Saturday on WIBW Radio

BY: - September 18, 2020

TOPEKA — U.S. Senate candidates Barbara Bollier and Roger Marshall are scheduled to debate Saturday for the first time in the general election for a broadcast and livestream on WIBW Radio and the Kansas Radio Networks. Marshall, a Great Bend Republican serving western Kansas as 1st District congressman, will be on the November ballot with […]

Kansas State University researchers involved in a $1.3 million research project to protect meat plant workers and surrounding communities from the spread of COVID-19 includes, from left, Randy Phebus, Sally Davis, Valentina Trinetta, Sara Gragg and Daniel Vega. (Submitted/Kansas Reflector)

Kansas State researchers to explore spread of COVID-19 at packing plants

BY: - September 14, 2020

TOPEKA — Researchers at Kansas State University will rely on a combination of state and federal funding to study effectiveness of sanitation procedures at livestock processing facilities designed to inactivate the virus causing COVID-19. The project relies on a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and $330,000 from the state of Kansas’ […]

Michelle De La Isla: U.S. House candidate pledges liberty, justice for all in Kansas

BY: - September 14, 2020

Topeka Mayor Michelle De La Isla, Democratic nomine for U.S. House in the 2nd District, wants Kansans to have an honest conversation about race.

Cancellation of the Kansas State Fair created an estimated $2.3 million revenue shortfall that fair officials want to be filled through a state or federal bailout. Some livestock events are being held, but the Pronto Pup, regarded as a banquet on a stick, won't be available until the fair in September 2021. (Tim Carpenter/Kansas Reflector)

Kansas State Fair outlines $2.3 million revenue shortfall, requests budget bailout

BY: - September 4, 2020

TOPEKA — Cancelling commercial aspects of the Kansas State Fair compelled the organization to halt building renovations, impose staffing cuts and set in motion a plan to raid its charitable foundation to cover an estimated $2.3 million revenue shortfall. David Tobias, interim general manager of the state fair, said the state fair could avoid some […]

The Kansas Legislature's auditors say industrial hemp remains a risky crop but growing expertise and development of markets for the plants fiber, grain and floral parts could generate more than $20 million annually in revenue within several years. (Submitted/Kansas Reflector)

Legislature’s auditors assess economic prospects of Kansas’ fledgling hemp crop

BY: - September 2, 2020

Value of Kansas' hemp crop in 2019 was modest, while Kansas State University is studying potential of using hemp flowers as cattle feed.

Kansas farmer Donn Teske, who operates a family farm in Pottawatomie County, is featured in the documentary film "The Disrupted" that blends the experiences of three hard-working Americans struggling to make it economically. (Submitted/Kansas Reflector)

Kansas farmer at heart of ‘Disrupted’ documentary on dehumanizing economic forces

BY: - August 28, 2020

TOPEKA — Fifth-generation Kansan Donn Teske’s commitment to family farm survival and humility inspired by German Lutheran lineage argued against taking part in a documentary capturing adversity of three seemingly divergent middle-class Americans compelled to adapt in a turbulent economy. Major health complications, staggering business debt and anxiety driven by a duty not to be […]

Alex Orel, a lobbyist with the Kansas Bankers Association, told a joint House and Senate economic recovery committee that COVID-19 added stress to Main Street businesses and the agriculture sector. (Tim Carpenter/Kansas Reflector)

Coronavirus draws Kansas farm bankruptcy, business stagnation into focus

BY: - August 12, 2020

Bipartisan Kansas legislative committee is sorting through COVID-19 economic problems to help speed business recovery.

Mark Pringle and his wife, Mary Jane Shanklin, say the pandemic has exacerbated issues that already existed in farming communities (Submitted)

Kansas farmers find themselves increasingly isolated, in need amid pandemic

BY: - August 11, 2020

TOPEKA — Mark Pringle has seen the self-sufficient mindset of many Kansas farmers and their families challenged by COVID-19 as the virus disproportionately impacts rural communities. Pringle is a fourth-generation farmer and the Democratic candidate for the Kansas House in the 13th District. He and his wife, Mary Jane Shanklin, a registered nurse, have watched […]

Kansas Sen. Jeff Longbine, an Emporia Republican, used a $336,000 loan through the federal Payroll Protection Program to sustain employment of more than 35 employees at his Longbine Auto Plaza. More than 53,000 Kansas businesses have made use of $5 billion in PPP loans. (Nick Krug for Kansas Reflector)

Emergency paycheck loan program delivers $5 billion to 53,000 Kansas businesses

BY: - August 9, 2020

TOPEKA — Chevrolet dealer Jeff Longbine understood the economic damage to sales from the COVID-19 pandemic and the potential benefit of an emergency federal loan program fashioned to sustain small businesses and prevent employee layoffs. He applied for and received $336,000 under the Paycheck Protection Program, which is the $669 billion nationwide initiative created through […]